Scientist singles dating

The authors found that when the available prospects varied more in attributes such as age, height, occupation and educational background, people made fewer dating proposals.This effect was particularly strong when individuals were faced with a large number of partners.In essence, heuristics are ingrained rules of thumb that allow us to save effort by ignoring some of the information available to us when we evaluate our options.For example, in those events with a relatively large number of participants, the researchers discovered that people attend predominantly to easily accessible features, such as age, height, physical attractiveness, and so forth, rather than clues that are harder to observe, for example, occupation and educational achievement.Additionally, in speed-dating events where the characteristics of the daters varied much more, most participants did not follow up with any of their matches.Results observed in the world of online dating support this finding.

In a typical speed-dating event, participants pair off at individual tables and chairs for a few minutes of conversation.’s free newsletters."data-newsletterpromo-image="https://static.scientificamerican.com/sciam/cache/file/458BF87F-514B-44EE-B87F5D531772CF83_source.png"data-newsletterpromo-button-text="Sign Up"data-newsletterpromo-button-link="https:// origincode=2018_sciam_Article Promo_Newsletter Sign Up"name="article Body" itemprop="article Body" AS A PSYCHOLOGIST, I have always found the concept of speed dating fascinating.During a series of mini dates, each spanning no more than a couple of minutes, participants in a speed-dating event evaluate a succession of eligible singles.A study in 2008 by Lenton and Barbara Fasolo of the London School of Economics and Political Science indicates that participants often misjudge how the number of options available to them will affect their feelings.Participants presented with a broad array of potential partners more closely aligned with their anticipated ideal did not experience greater emotional satisfaction than when presented with fewer options.

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