Accomodating disability employer

These accommodations are reasonable because they appear to be feasible solutions to this employee's problems dealing with changes to his routine. They also appear to be effective because they would enable him to perform his cleaning duties. This "cost/benefit" analysis has no foundation in the statute, regulations, or legislative history of the ADA. Reasonable accommodation is available to qualified applicants and employees with disabilities. Reasonable accommodations must be provided to qualified employees regardless of whether they work part- time or full-time, or are considered "probationary." Generally, the individual with a disability must inform the employer that an accommodation is needed. For a further discussion of this issue, see Question 31, infra. "[W]ith or without reasonable accommodation" includes, if necessary, reassignment to a vacant position.

Reasonable accommodation removes workplace barriers for individuals with disabilities.

Similarly, a reasonable accommodation enables an applicant with a disability to have an equal opportunity to participate in the application process and to be considered for a job. Barnett, the Supreme Court held that it was unreasonable, absent "special circumstances," for an employer to provide a reassignment that conflicts with the terms of a seniority system.

Finally, a reasonable accommodation allows an employee with a disability an equal opportunity to enjoy the benefits and privileges of employment that employees without disabilities enjoy.

Reassignment issues addressed include who is entitled to reassignment and the extent to which an employer must search for a vacant position.

The Guidance also examines issues concerning the interplay between reasonable accommodations and conduct rules.

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